Difference between revisions of "PLOrk compositions"

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(PLOrk Compositions)
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=[[PLOrk]] Compositions=
 
=[[PLOrk]] Compositions=
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The ABC Song
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(arr. Dan Trueman)
 +
 +
* Program Notes:
 +
PLOrk in kindergarten! Here the plorkers play an instrument where the laptop keyboard "speaks" the names of all the keys when typed. Each player has recorded 5 or so samples of themselves speaking the name of each key ("A", "shift", "return", etc....). When they type a key, one of those samples is randomly chosen for playback. These samples can then be filtered to create pitches, as in this 3-part rendition of the ABC Song.
 +
 +
* Technical Notes:
 +
* Links to Patches:
 +
* Links to Recordings and Video:
 +
 +
----
 +
The PLOrk Drones
 +
(Dan Trueman)
 +
 +
*Program Notes:
 +
This piece is a quasi-improvisation based on Risset drones. The plorkestra improvises elements within a group texture, based on test suggestions and parameter shifts from the conductor.
 +
 +
* Technical Notes:
 +
* Links to Patches:
 +
* Links to Recordings and Video:
 +
----
 +
The PLOrk Tree
 +
(Dan Trueman)
 +
 +
*Program Notes:
 +
This piece is a quasi-improvisation based on a network tree. Locked to a common pulse, the plork members control a group texture by inheriting information from a network neighbor, and then making slight modifications to that information, which includes pitches, timbres, and text messages, which are then all sent on to another network neighbor, eventually feeding back through the tree. Ripples of data are sent through the network by the conductor, who defines the basic structure of the texture, but only has marginal control, given the subversive nature of most plorkers.
 +
* Technical Notes:
 +
* Links to Patches:
 +
* Links to Recordings and Video:
 +
----

Revision as of 00:23, 29 June 2006

PLOrk Compositions

The ABC Song (arr. Dan Trueman)

  • Program Notes:

PLOrk in kindergarten! Here the plorkers play an instrument where the laptop keyboard "speaks" the names of all the keys when typed. Each player has recorded 5 or so samples of themselves speaking the name of each key ("A", "shift", "return", etc....). When they type a key, one of those samples is randomly chosen for playback. These samples can then be filtered to create pitches, as in this 3-part rendition of the ABC Song.

  • Technical Notes:
  • Links to Patches:
  • Links to Recordings and Video:

The PLOrk Drones (Dan Trueman)

  • Program Notes:

This piece is a quasi-improvisation based on Risset drones. The plorkestra improvises elements within a group texture, based on test suggestions and parameter shifts from the conductor.

  • Technical Notes:
  • Links to Patches:
  • Links to Recordings and Video:

The PLOrk Tree (Dan Trueman)

  • Program Notes:

This piece is a quasi-improvisation based on a network tree. Locked to a common pulse, the plork members control a group texture by inheriting information from a network neighbor, and then making slight modifications to that information, which includes pitches, timbres, and text messages, which are then all sent on to another network neighbor, eventually feeding back through the tree. Ripples of data are sent through the network by the conductor, who defines the basic structure of the texture, but only has marginal control, given the subversive nature of most plorkers.

  • Technical Notes:
  • Links to Patches:
  • Links to Recordings and Video: