Difference between revisions of "PLOrk spring2007/AssignmentOne"

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In this stage, you will build a module of code in ChucK which will perform some rhythmic task and will trigger sounds.  Your code should contain some kind of cycling process (while loop, etc) and should trigger sounds in repetitive or statistical patterns.  Any sound can be used: a soundfile, classic computer music sounds (periodic waveforms, noise), instrument models from the STK library, etc.
 
In this stage, you will build a module of code in ChucK which will perform some rhythmic task and will trigger sounds.  Your code should contain some kind of cycling process (while loop, etc) and should trigger sounds in repetitive or statistical patterns.  Any sound can be used: a soundfile, classic computer music sounds (periodic waveforms, noise), instrument models from the STK library, etc.
  
Examples (post here from class?)
+
Examples (post here from class)
  
 
====Deliverables====
 
====Deliverables====
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Continue developing your looping module, and add interactive elements to it.  For example, map keys on the keyboard to functions that will change the sound.  Among these should be some sort of volume control.  You may also use the mouse, or begin experimenting with external USB devices.  Begin to think of this module as an instrument, and start to imagine ways you can expand upon it's capabilities.
 
Continue developing your looping module, and add interactive elements to it.  For example, map keys on the keyboard to functions that will change the sound.  Among these should be some sort of volume control.  You may also use the mouse, or begin experimenting with external USB devices.  Begin to think of this module as an instrument, and start to imagine ways you can expand upon it's capabilities.
  
Examples (post here from class?)
+
Examples (post here from class)
 +
 
 +
====Deliverables====
 +
 
 +
* programs (ChucK files), sound files (if any)
 +
* README file explaining your approach in creating the piece, what tools you used, any difficulties you encountered, and any additional notes.
 +
 
 +
You will present your results in class.
 +
 
 +
===Part C : Prepare a Performance===
 +
 
 +
*Due Thursday, March 8
 +
 
 +
Now begin thinking about your instrument as a performance tool, and prepare a 2-4 minute performance.  You may use others in the class, or multiple computers, if you wish.  For example, you might try having five or six people play your instrument on different machines.
 +
 
 +
Examples (post here from class)
  
 
====Deliverables====
 
====Deliverables====

Revision as of 09:37, 16 February 2007

Looping Rhythmic Generator

Inspired by the question posed by the reporter from Fox News: "... but can you dance to it?"

...

In this assignment you will, in stages, build an interactive rhythmic generator in ChucK, learn how to play it creatively, and perform music for the class using your new instrument. Think carefully about what kind of device you might like to make. It could be a drum machine, or an analog sequencer, or emulation of mechanical or other cycling process. You define what "rhythmic" means.

This is a solo project (everyone should create a piece), and will be due in stages. Details are below:

Part A : Loop-Trigger Module

  • Due Next Week (Thursday, Feb. 22)

In this stage, you will build a module of code in ChucK which will perform some rhythmic task and will trigger sounds. Your code should contain some kind of cycling process (while loop, etc) and should trigger sounds in repetitive or statistical patterns. Any sound can be used: a soundfile, classic computer music sounds (periodic waveforms, noise), instrument models from the STK library, etc.

Examples (post here from class)

Deliverables

  • programs (ChucK files), sound files (if any)
  • README file explaining your approach in creating the piece, what tools you used, any difficulties you encountered, and any additional notes.

You will present your results in class.


Part B : Expand and Add Interaction

  • Due Thursday, March 1

Continue developing your looping module, and add interactive elements to it. For example, map keys on the keyboard to functions that will change the sound. Among these should be some sort of volume control. You may also use the mouse, or begin experimenting with external USB devices. Begin to think of this module as an instrument, and start to imagine ways you can expand upon it's capabilities.

Examples (post here from class)

Deliverables

  • programs (ChucK files), sound files (if any)
  • README file explaining your approach in creating the piece, what tools you used, any difficulties you encountered, and any additional notes.

You will present your results in class.

Part C : Prepare a Performance

  • Due Thursday, March 8

Now begin thinking about your instrument as a performance tool, and prepare a 2-4 minute performance. You may use others in the class, or multiple computers, if you wish. For example, you might try having five or six people play your instrument on different machines.

Examples (post here from class)

Deliverables

  • programs (ChucK files), sound files (if any)
  • README file explaining your approach in creating the piece, what tools you used, any difficulties you encountered, and any additional notes.

You will present your results in class.